Iceland – Reykjavík

In case you missed it…

After dropping Anna off at the airport, we made our way back towards Reykjavík, the capital city of Iceland and home to about 2/3 of the country’s population. We were going to be here for just one night before heading off to Akureyri for a few days and returning for another night before our flight home.

Hallgrimskirkja Church.

Our Airbnb was about 20 minutes outside of the city center, nestled in a quiet neighborhood with a lane divider meaning you had to come down the street going the correct direction or make a dramatic loop around the needlessly large block to be able to access the driveway.

In order to lengthen our funds, we decided to head to the local Bónus supermarket and get some ingredients to make spaghetti, since the place we were staying had a full kitchen. While I made dinner, Rachel had started on doing some laundry. We had picked this particular Airbnb because it had a washer and dryer, which meant we could cut our packed clothes in half.

Clearly, we don’t understand how European washers work…

After starting to run our clothes through the wash, we noticed that the wash cycle never ended. Eventually, we had to force the washer to stop, never figuring out how to put it through a drain cycle, so when we opened the door, the clothes were sitting in a puddle of water. I tried for a little while to Google the model of the washer and tried to figure it out but in the end, we had to improvise. Rachel and I created an assembly line, where I fished the clothes out of the washer, ringing them out before passing them to her to ring them out further in the shower and putting them into the dryer. We continued this for the entire load, minus the few items that we had to hang dry around the room (like merino wool base layers.)

After the adventure that was laundry, we wanted to explore downtown with the remaining daylight that was available. We hopped back in our Kia and made the quick drive to a parking lot outside of the Hallgrimskirkja Church.

The Hallgrimskirkja Church dominates the iconic skyline that we associate with Reykjavik. Its design was inspired by the basalt columns that decorate the country’s volcanic landscape and sits atop a hill that overlooks the whole city and harbor. The church took a relatively long time to build. The local parish started looking for designs in the 1920s before an architect was selected and construction began in 1945; however, the church’s construction didn’t finish until 1986, thirty-six years after the death of the original designer.

Me and my boy, Leif.

While the majestic spire steals your attention at first, the building does offer much more. The front door is large and beautiful, decorated with imagery and text. In front of the church is a statue of Leif Erikson, the Nordic explorer thought to have been the first European to have set foot in North America. The statue was gifted to Iceland by the United States in 1930 as a commemmoration of the 1,000th anniversary of Iceland’s first parliament meeting at Þingvellir (pronounced Thingvellir in English) which also happens to be the oldest parliament in the world.

After making Rachel take a lot a couple pictures of me posing in front of Leif Erikson, we wandered into the city, choosing one of the many streets that lead away from the church into the shopping and restaurant district of the city. We wandered the streets, popping into souvenir shops and bookstores and a cool Viking-inspired shop that sold carved axes and jewelry.

Rye bread ice cream.

Wanting a break from the mild climb of the hilly roads, we stopped in the famous Kaffi Loki. I got a local beer and we split a rye bread ice cream complete with cream and a tasty rhubarb syrup. It was delicious! This took us towards the end of the night and we were back near our car so we headed back to our Airbnb for the night to rest before heading up to Akureyri.

On our way back through, at the end of our trip, we stopped for another night in Reykjavik. The morning of our flight home, we had a few extra hours to go back to the city where we were able to see the Sun Voyager sculpture, a symbol of freedom and hope.

Sun Voyager looking over Mt. Esja.

Reykjavik is a wonderful city and I cannot wait to go back. Do you have any can’t miss spots in Iceland or is it on your bucket list? Let me know in the comments below.

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