Iceland – Vík To Höfn

Continued from Part 1.

From here, we headed east along the Ring Road. We took a few short stops during our drive, but one was extra epic. There was a gravel road that ran off of the highway and we decided to follow it. Thankfully, we had a 4×4 vehicle because this drive was bumpy. We inched along bump by bump until we flattened out into a parking lot. We had made it to Sveitarfélagið Hornafjörður, a beautiful fjord that offers glacier hikes and an incredible view. We did a quick change of outfits and were so excited about our find that we had to bust out some dance moves.

Fun fact: This glacier was one of the landing spots for the first aerial circumnavigation of the world in 1924.

Along the highway, on either side of a bridge, you arrive at Diamond Beach. Jökulsárlón lagoon carries mini iceburgs out to the sea from the Breidamerkurjokull glacier giving incredible photo opportunities who want to capture the beautiful, blue-clear ice shining against the black sand. It definitely earned its namesake, in terms of looks. While we were enjoying the view, one seemingly brave individual unzipped his jacket to reveal a wetsuit and grabbed a surfboard from his vehicle. He ended up just snapping some photos of himself with a remote-controlled camera.

That night, we stayed in Höfn, a small harbor village. We got some subs with local fish and ice cream before calling it a night. My cold was really acting up and I sat outside in the Airbnb’s common area doing my best not to keep everyone awake with my coughing. Extra strength menthol cough drops were my lifeline during this trip. Those and bags of sweet chili pepper Doritos. As the night went on and I tried to make myself tired enough to sleep through my cough, I was looking at the My Aurora Forecast app to see if we had any chance of seeing the northern lights. It was too cloudy the entire time we were there, but there was some magnetic activity in the area that night.

The next morning, we drove up to the Viking Cafe, near the Vestrahorn mountain. For 800 Icelandic Króna (ISK), you can visit an abandoned viking village movie set, an easy walk from the cafe. You’re free to roam the grounds and explore, but by the time we reached the settlement, the rain and snow had picked up and we were getting pelted and drenched, cutting our exploration to just a brief run through.

After we made it back to the car, we took a short drive to the Stokksnes area – a gorgeous beach with dramatic views. Between windstorms throwing sand at us, a frigid breeze, and more snow, we managed to have an outfit change and take my favorite photos of the trip. I’m cutting this paragraph short because I cannot find words to describe Anna’s work here.

For our trip back, we stopped at the same Airbnb in Vík as our first night (where I once again tried to stay up until the middle of the night to have a chance at seeing the northern lights) and revisited Reynisfjara. Along the road to the beach is the Loftsalahellir Cave, which you can get to after a steep, muddy climb. We snapped a few more photos and continued on. We had to drop Anna off at the airport before Rachel and I continued to Reykjavik and then the north.

We were one small slip away from being covered in mud trying to get here.

The Ring Road is essentially the only way to traverse most of Iceland. There aren’t secondary or tertiary routes to follow, so if something happens on route 1, it happens to everyone trying to drive on that section. We ended up in a long standstill that resulted from a car crash a few kilometers ahead. Rumor was (I spoke with a lady that had a badge so I believe her) that the family had to be evacuated by helicopter, though I never thoroughly followed up on the story to see how valid that was. Nothing pops up on Google, so I have to assume the incident was minor. We eventually got through and dropped Anna off at the airport, saying our goodbyes and heading off for the second half of our trip.

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